Last 10 pounds…

I have 10 pounds to go to reach my weight loss goal. When I started this journey I signed up with HealthyWage.com (HW) and made a bet I would lose 120 pounds in 15 months.

My motivation for signing up was to use HW as an accountability partner. I had lost weight before… but in the past, I would get to a point where I had lost some pounds (never reaching my goal weight) and then would either get upset because it was too hard, or get mad because I stopped losing (which was happening because I wasn’t being honest with myself that I was eating unhealthy foods or too many calories). With HW, I pay the amount of a gym membership every month and as part of the accountability, I weigh in often to track progress. There are even team and jackpot challenges I’ve participated in which have made it fun and kept me engaged.

As the final weeks before my last weigh in approach, though, my thoughts have started running rampant. I sometimes find myself talking to myself about not winning, or not achieving the goal I signed up to achieve. Up until a few days ago, I was stressing myself out and worrying about weighing out and seeing a number on the scale that wasn’t the “right” number.

Then, my friend Zuta texted me. She was “checking in” to see how I was doing and told me she wanted to start eating a high fat diet (which I have been doing to lose weight). She asked me a couple of questions and I answered. Then I did something I don’t normally do. I shared with her that I had 10 pounds to go and a few weeks left and I was worried I wasn’t going to make it. She texted back, “You totally got this!” and in that moment something relaxed in me. The thoughts were still there, but they were quieter and didn’t have ahold of me.

After I received her text, I started seeing all the ways I would worry about things. And I saw my tendency to start complaining about what I was doing, which made finishing it harder.

Perfect example: about 3 weeks ago, my friend Pamela and I ran the “Rock the Parkway” 1/2 marathon in Kansas City. 13.1 miles was the longest distance I had ever run. I remember lining up in the pace areas which designated how fast we would go through the race. Once we started, it seemed pretty easy. Then when we got to mile 7 or 8, my legs were cramping, and I wasn’t loving the experience anymore.

JenandPamI noticed as I was talking to Pamela, I was complaining about this… or that. And I proudly shared them with her. “I’m done,” “my legs hurt,” “I don’t want to do this.” She listened and then finally said casually, “You realize quitting is not an option.” I giggled because I knew she had read my thoughts that I was ready to quit. After that, I didn’t complain anymore. I re-engaged in the race. And before I knew it, I could see the finish line. We did it!

Accountability is so important. Whether it’s the HealthyWage app, or a commitment to track food, or having a friend telling you the truth, being accountable creates honesty and engagement when the task at hand seems insurmountable. I used to think I didn’t want to tell anyone I had a goal to lose weight. The reason, I rationalized, was because I thought they would be judging me. The reality was the little child inside of me didn’t want to be told not to do those things which didn’t support my goal.

I wouldn’t be 10 pounds from my goal now if I didn’t have accountability. And the cool thing is, having people to talk to about what I’m doing and how I’m feeling, especially when I perceive that the “going has gotten tough” is a gift. It allows me to rebalance and refocus on the goal so I can dig in and give my best to completion.

13 thoughts on “Last 10 pounds…”

  1. Hi Jen, congratulations on nearing the “finish line”! Only 10 pounds. So happy for you.
    You are truly inspiring!
    Since discovering kaizen (the philosophy of making small steps, and breaking significant challenges into small and effortless ones), I love reading books by Robert Maurer who has a Ph.D. in psychology, is a professor, and specializing in studying success and why those who succeed are successful. His is also consulting and teaching in this area. I am quite fascinated by the possibility of positive psychology. In his book “Mastering Fear” he has the following inspiring note explaining some of the reasons for success:
    “We are meant to reach to another for support. We are suggesting that the Law of Success, the fork in the road to success to is being aware of and accepting of fear and be willing when afraid, to reach to another for support.” – Maurer, Robert. Mastering Fear (p. 35). Career Press. Kindle Edition.
    Then he says that Darwin was misinterpreted concerning the survival of the strongest. He quoted Darwin as follows:
    “What Darwin wrote was: ‘In the long history of humankind (and animal kind too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.'” – Maurer, Robert. Mastering Fear (p. 37). Career Press. Kindle Edition.
    Robert Maurer says that worries, anxiety, depression are all unhealthy response to fear, which is natural and appears when we wish something or attempt to achieve something.
    I was excited to discover that a healthy response for fear is to reach out for help and support. The scientists came to this conclusion when they observed animals and their response to fear:
    “In observations in the wild it’s been noted that, when facing a threat, chimpanzees consistently make eye contact with one another as a first response before attacking or leaping to safety.” – Maurer, Robert. Mastering Fear (pp. 32-33). Career Press. Kindle Edition.
    Isn’t it amazing?
    Your reaching out to your friend Zuta reminded me of the chapter in Robert Maurer’s book that I am currently reading (among others). And the fact that you reached out to your friends for support and expressed your fears will undoubtedly contribute to your success.
    Enjoy losing the last 10 pounds!

    Like

      1. I am also looking forward to seeing and talking to you this weekend! Victoria

        Like

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